‘Why Nigerian exporters’ access to U.S. markets is limited’


Inconsistencies hinged on inadequate power supply, multiple taxes, business expansion have been identified as some of the challenges hindering Nigerians in the commodity export business from meeting up with demands of the United States export market.

Moreso, exporters who tend to make quick returns by cutting corners and keeping to the rules in the analysis of export business have also affected the smooth sail of export business in Nigeria.

These challenges, the National President, Nigeria-America Chamber of Commerce, Chief Olabintan Famutimi, noted have created a break along the export value chain.


Also, the chamber has concluded plans to build the capacity of small businesses as part of measures to reduce the mortality rate of such businesses.Famutimi stated this when the chamber paid a courtesy visit to the corporate head office of The Guardian to form a partnership and exchange ideas on mutual relationships with the organization.

According to him, some of the problems have been identified and through the advice given to government, issues would be addressed.Famutimi said: “In some of our trainings, we bring subject matter experts from both the U.S., the West African trade hub and even government agencies. In some of the summits we have had, we involved agencies such as Customs, NAFDAC, SON and all other departments involved in the export business to address problems to ease export of commodities to the US,” he said.

He assured that initial difficulties experienced by those in the US who wants to come and do business in Nigeria have been resolved while he further stated that it is also working in the US for Nigerians applying to go to the US to for business as delays have been reduced.

“One of the elements tackled was visa on arrival and is working smoothly. If you are coming on business in Nigeria and you get to the airport, they can stamp your visa at the airport and you enter, it is working very well. Once you have a letter of invitation that you are coming to do business in Nigeria, your passport would be stamped.

“They have talked to all Nigerian embassies abroad that anybody applying for a business should not be delayed and it is also working over there.”
Worried that Nigeria could not take advantage of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) that was meant to expand the country’s export window while it lasted, the editor of The Guardian, Abraham Ogbodo tasked the chamber to critically look into cultivating the capacity to export primary goods rather than only promoting ideas on export businesses.