NIPOST to disengage illegal courier operators


The Courier Regulatory Department (CRD) of the Nigerian Postal Service (NIPOST), has revealed plans to disengage illegal courier firms in Nigeria operating without valid licences or yet to renew their permits.

Already, the licences of 11 firms have been revoked, while three others were sealed, the General Manager, CRD, Dr. Ishaya Diwa, told journalists at a media conference in Lagos, where he noted that operating a courier business without the requisite permit is defrauding the government of huge sums of money.
Diwa explained that licences of the 11 courier companies were revoked following their refusal to renew them for up to a period of four years.

The affected 11 companies include, 21st Century Courier, ABX Air Business Express Nigeria Limited, Concorde Express, Denca Global Courier, Glintz Express Limited, Maxi Express and Logistics, Saferman Courier, Somadek Global Services Limited, and Souche Parcel Service. Others are Starlite Courier Express Nigeria Limited, and Urban Rural Courier, while those that were sealed were On Time Express, Integrated Dispatch Express, and Time Code Services all of which have offices in Lagos, and other parts of the country.


“The operators hereby seize to operate courier business in the country because of their involvement in unethical practice, which the regulatory body frowns at. The General public should take note of this, and desist from doing courier business with the listed companies in the country,” Diwa said.

He warned that customers who continue to do business with them after the revocation, are at a big risk, as the CRD surveillance team can visit the operators any time and confiscate all items found in their offices, and prosecute them, if found operating behind closed doors.

According to him, renewal of licence fee is once yearly and it costs N350, 000 to renew licences of indigenous local courier operators and N1.5 million for foreign international courier operators.

According to him, “By law, courier operators that refused to renew their licence, is as good as operating without a licence, and this is tantamount to unethical practice, because they know the law but refused to abide by it.”

The Head, Ethics and Inspectorate, Solomon Olufemi, noted that before the raid, several letters were sent to the firms, warning them of the implication of operating a courier business without a licence, and advised them to register, which they ignored.

Olufemi, said the firms will seize to operate until they regularised their operational licences, while items collected from their offices would be used as evidence that they were in business without a licence.